In Moonrise Kingdom, Tilda Swinton plays a social worker in Sixties’ America. She said she modelled her character’s imperious look on the Frau von Kalteneck character played by Ursula Jeans in the classic British movie The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp. (Dailymail)

While Anderson has spoken about how Francois Truffaut, Ken Loach and Alan Parker’s films centered around children influenced “Moonrise Kingdom,” he also revealed a broader influence:the filmmaking duo Powell and Pressburger.

“For many years some of the movies that have most inspired me especially in a visual way are the Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger films,” he said. “…so much of that work is about making these visual…quite artificial films and there’s something very exciting about what they’ve made that’s in front of the camera, and you know the ‘Red Shoes' in particular is the subject matter too, but you know one of my favorites is 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp'…and also 'Black Narcissus’; [it’s] about a woman in the Himalayas and they did it all on a soundstage.”

Perhaps Anderson was describing how artifice - like what many critics complain about in his films - can be equally emotional and poignant when artfully constructed. “You really are transported to that place but you feel that someone has made these things and they’re very emotional, moving films,”  the filmmaker said, also noted that their approach to music is very influential. “I also would say Powell and Pressberger, are a very good inspiration for music as well. ‘The Red Shoes’ is a movie where there’s a very long sequence where the music was written first and the movie was made to the music, I mean it was a dance so it makes sense. In our movie this Benjamin Britten music that we use — a lot of the movie was choreographed to it and we drew a lot of the scenes and semi-animated them in advance. So we sort of knew where the cuts were going to be based on the music.” (The Playlist)

In Moonrise Kingdom, Tilda Swinton plays a social worker in Sixties’ America. She said she modelled her character’s imperious look on the Frau von Kalteneck character played by Ursula Jeans in the classic British movie The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp. (Dailymail)

While Anderson has spoken about how Francois Truffaut, Ken Loach and Alan Parker’s films centered around children influenced “Moonrise Kingdom,” he also revealed a broader influence:the filmmaking duo Powell and Pressburger.

“For many years some of the movies that have most inspired me especially in a visual way are the Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger films,” he said. “…so much of that work is about making these visual…quite artificial films and there’s something very exciting about what they’ve made that’s in front of the camera, and you know the ‘Red Shoes' in particular is the subject matter too, but you know one of my favorites is 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp'…and also 'Black Narcissus’; [it’s] about a woman in the Himalayas and they did it all on a soundstage.”

Perhaps Anderson was describing how artifice - like what many critics complain about in his films - can be equally emotional and poignant when artfully constructed. “You really are transported to that place but you feel that someone has made these things and they’re very emotional, moving films,”  the filmmaker said, also noted that their approach to music is very influential. “I also would say Powell and Pressberger, are a very good inspiration for music as well. ‘The Red Shoes’ is a movie where there’s a very long sequence where the music was written first and the movie was made to the music, I mean it was a dance so it makes sense. In our movie this Benjamin Britten music that we use — a lot of the movie was choreographed to it and we drew a lot of the scenes and semi-animated them in advance. So we sort of knew where the cuts were going to be based on the music.” (The Playlist)

fuckyeahantonwalbrook:

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Powell and Pressburger, 1943)

fuckyeahantonwalbrook:

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Powell and Pressburger, 1943)